Tag: Angela Brackenreed

Canola School: Harvesting Snow-Bound and Frozen Canola

It might only be the middle of October, but it looks and feels like winter in parts of Western Canada, especially as you move north and west in Alberta and Saskatchewan. Snow and freezing rain have left many canola growers with a helpless feeling as crop that was ready to be harvested is now under… Read more »

Canola School: Solving the Mystery of Heated Canola

Maybe it’s due to news traveling faster on social media than it used to, but there have been a fair number of reports of canola heating in the bin this winter. Producers who find themselves in these unfortunate situations are often left scratching their heads wondering why it happened. Was it harvested too early? Was it straight-cut or… Read more »

Canola School: Harvest Management — It’s Not All or Nothing

In recent years, the conversation around harvest management has heated up, with the inclusion of a debate that centres around straight cutting versus swathing. But, says RealAgriculture’s Shaun Haney, “debate is the wrong word.” “We get trapped into this all or nothing scenario — it’s sort of like tillage versus no-till — right? You’re either one or you’re… Read more »

Canola School: What Caused Premature Ripening? Tips for End of Season Scouting

While you’re in the field checking canola to see if it’s ready to be cut, or perhaps already swathing or harvesting it, it’s also a good time to assess the toll disease took on your crop. Sclerotinia, blackleg and clubroot can all cause premature ripening, as disease symptoms become more obvious at the end of the season,… Read more »

Canola School: Cutting Canola in the Heat

Hot conditions can have an impact on both yield and quality in canola, making timing more important when swathing or straight-cutting the crop. Much of Western Canada has experienced a mid-August heat wave, with fields maturing rapidly in the heat. For canola, this means the time to cut can sneak up quickly. In this Canola… Read more »

Canola School: Getting Tested for Clubroot

Unless it’s too late and you’ve already found clubroot symptoms in your canola, you won’t know whether you have it without getting tested. This Canola School episode focuses on testing for clubroot and how to go about determining whether clubroot spores are present in the soil. Finding the nasty soil-borne disease when spore loads are still low… Read more »

Canola School: Assessing Seed Survival and Seeder Performance

Do you know how many of your canola seeds turned into viable plants? Frost damage, weeds and insect pests aren’t the only things to look for in canola fields as the plants pop out of the ground. Seed survival should also be assessed, emphasizes Angela Brackenreed, agronomy specialist with the Canola Council of Canada in this Canola… Read more »

Canola School: Eliminating the Competition — Weed Control Before and After Seeding

With seeding underway, it’s easy to switch the drill from cereals to canola and just continue rolling. However, Angela Brackenreed of the Canola Council of Canada has a reminder in this wet and windy Canola School episode: a clean, weed-free start to the growing season is more important than an early start. Dig into the Canola… Read more »

Canola School: Does Your Canola Pass the Smell Test? Reports of Heated Canola Rise

There’s been a rise in reports of heated canola over the last few weeks, with some crushers saying they can’t accommodate any more until well into the new year. “It’s unfortunate this has to happen, but it is a good reminder for the rest of us to monitor our bins,” says Angela Brackenreed, agronomy specialist… Read more »

Canola School: The Ultimate Canola Challenge Hammers Down on ROI

The Ultimate Canola Challenge was an idea the Canola Council of Canada (CCC) dreamed up for a 2013 start. The initial thought was that the project would help demonstrate how to grow high yielding canola crops and that researchers would submit production practices and later determine whose demonstrated the greatest potential. “But we couldn’t find any researchers who were… Read more »

Canola School: Why Imaging Technology Can’t Replace Scouting Skills

You’ve seen UAVs at work and added one to your Christmas list. You’ve mapped out management zones using data from a Veris machine or imagery from a satellite. You have GPS-referenced yield maps and a GreenSeeker in your back pocket. You are the farmer who loves a good gadget and wants imagery to make field… Read more »

Canola Storage Over the Summer — What Should you Do Differently?

It’s a research project that’s never been done before, because, frankly, there really wasn’t much reason to tackle the question. But now farmers want to know — What’s the best way to condition canola for storage over the summer? This summer, the Prairie Agriculture Machinery Institute (PAMI) is running a trial (funded by the three… Read more »

Canola School: Mid-Summer Scouting Reminders

It’s mid-July and that means the canola is blooming! It also means you’re trying to sneak in some down-time at the local fair or at the cabin. And that’s a fantastic plan, says Angela Brackenreed, agronomist with the Canola Council of Canada, but before you go, there are a few things to scout for in… Read more »

Canola School: Basing Seeding Rates on Thousand Kernel Weight

Are you seeding your canola at 5lb/ac? Unless your seed rate was calculated based on that seed lot’s thousand kernel weight (TKW), you may be losing yield potential, as plant numbers decline with increasing seed size. Angela Brackenreed, agronomy specialist with the Canola Council of Canada, suggests re-calibrating when the TKW of a seed lot… Read more »

Canola School: Clubroot symptoms, scouting & sanitation

No longer only the concern of Alberta canola growers, clubroot symptoms have been found in at least two Manitoba canola fields. This is a disease that, once established, is not easily controlled and is essentially impossible to eradicate. All canola growers in the Prairie Provinces need to be on the look out for this disease… Read more »