Tag: Dr. John Gavloski

Canola School: The Basics of Insect Sweeping

By now you’re fully aware of the importance of monitoring insect pests in your canola. So, you’ve collected and assembled your sweep-net, now what? The standard technique for sweeping is one 180 degree sweep for every quick step through the canola field (accompanied by the odd fall, of course). Sounds simple (and perhaps slightly embarrassing), but… Read more »

Canola School: Bertha Armyworm Monitoring, Scouting and Control

Have you been keeping an eye on the bertha armyworm monitoring trap numbers in your area? As we crawl closer to mid-July, it’s important to be aware of regional risks, and have a good understanding of proper scouting techniques and spray timing. “You’re going to have your best success spraying at night,” says John Gavloski, provincial entomologist with… Read more »

Wheat School: Midge Scouting, Susceptibility and Thresholds

In recent years, wheat midge has caused yield losses to fields across the prairie provinces, and has been blamed for wheat quality losses as well, including: aborted kernels, feeding lines and bran rupturing. So we know wheat midge is a significant pest, but did you have any idea that once anthers are present, the plant is no… Read more »

Insecticide/Fungicide Mixing Risks in Canola & the Importance of Pollinators

It can seem like an efficient way to solve two problems at once — add an insecticide in with the fungicide on canola and, voila, all your pest troubles go away. But not so fast. While applying an insecticide when pest insect levels are at or above threshold may be the right move, adding an… Read more »

Canola School: Are Striped Flea Beetles Resistant to Seed Treatments?

It’s no secret that the striped flea beetle is a tougher opponent than the more common crucifer flea beetle. This canola pest tends to emerge earlier than the crucifer type and isn’t as easily killed by commonly used seed treatments. That does not mean, however, that the striped flea beetle is resistant to neonicotinoids, as… Read more »