Tag: Gregory Sekulic

Record Colony Numbers, Neonics, & the Single Largest Threat to Bees

Contrary to what some headlines and marketing campaigns would lead us to believe, honey bee numbers in Canada are at record highs and trending higher. At the end of 2016, there were a record 750 thousand colonies in the country, according to Statistics Canada. “The state of the bee industry is quite strong right now,”… Read more »

Canola School: Taking High Quality Diagnostic Photos

With a smartphone in their pocket, every farmer, farm employee, or agronomist is now also a photographer. The ability to share pictures from the field has dramatically improved how farmers and agronomists communicate and diagnose issues. However, the information gleaned from a cellphone photo can only be as good as the original picture. A poor photo won’t tell… Read more »

Canola School: Diagnosing Calcium Deficiency

Although canola’s calcium requirements are relatively high (about double the level of sulphur and phosphorous, according to the Canola Council of Canada), deficiencies are rarely seen in western Canada. When deficiencies do occur, it is often as a result of highly saturated soils, which do not allow the plant to take up adequate nutrients. That… Read more »

Canola School – Bees & Beneficials – Defining Terms, Protecting Habitat and Recognizing Benefits

“Neonicotinoids,” “Colony Collapse Disorder,” “Varroa,” “Nosema”… Defining those colloquialisms (and others) was just one of the goals the Canola Council of Canada’s Gregory Sekulic had in mind when he presented “Buzzwords about Bees” at the Farming Smarter Conference in Medicine Hat. Sekulic wanted to clear the air on jargon that so often exacerbates misunderstanding “We really lose… Read more »

Canola School: The Canola Yield Penalty of Early-Emerged Weeds

Few crops are hyper-competitive right off the start. A cool spring can also mean that the crop you want to take off doesn’t, and the weeds get a head start. This is especially true of winter annuals which begin growing as soon as the snow recedes, but also applies to spring germinating weeds as well…. Read more »

Canola School: Estimating Flea Beetle Damage & Protecting Beneficial Insect Populations

We’ve finally got a crop up in Western Canada, but as soon as those tiny canola plants emerge the attacks begin. Seedling blights are one concern at the establishment phase, but flea beetles can be a huge threat to the canola crop. In this episode of the Canola School, Lyndsey Smith is joined by Canola… Read more »

Canola School: The Seedling Blight Complex & Minimum Plant Stand Numbers

Have you walked your canola fields shortly after emergence only to find several seedlings struggling and dying off or found seeds rotting in the furrow? Even treated seed can’t fully overcome the pressure of the seedling disease complex endemic to all of Western Canada’s canola growing region, especially if canola is seeded too deep or… Read more »

Agronomy Geeks West — Ep. 9: What’s Hurting Canola Yield Potential The Most?

What costs the canola crop the most in yield each year? Lack of fertility? Harvest losses? Spoilage in storage? Swath timing? The question isn’t actually entirely fair, as we can’t necessarily answer this question precisely, but we can most certainly start to stack up the evidence to support or refute each of these management areas’… Read more »

Canola School: Top Tips for Protecting Bees While Protecting Your Canola

Bees play an essential role as pollinators in food production, but did you know they’re also an integral part of top canola yields? While bees aren’t necessary for canola seed set, fields where bees have foraged will yield higher and benefit from a shorter flowering window. The importance of canola to bees is also significant; 80%… Read more »