Tag: Mario Tenuta

Credits and Costs: Understanding the Carbon Balance of Annual Cropping

If farmers are going to pay a tax on carbon emissions, they should also receive credit for the carbon their farms remove from the atmosphere. Many in the farm community are trying to make that case, as the federal and provincial governments roll out pricing systems that appear to lean on the cost side of the… Read more »

Breaking Down the Hot Air and Cold Truth About Carbon Emissions

Mario Tenuta has been studying greenhouse gas emissions in agriculture for longer than he’s willing to admit. Never before has he seen this much interest in the topic. “We’ve always had interest in carbon sequestration and the use of nitrogen fertilizers and manures, but now where we are called to some form of action and reductions, now… Read more »

Canola School: Making Up for Canola’s Nonexistent Relationship with Mycorrhizae

If the world of soil biology had its own version of Facebook, crops like peas, lentils, corn and flax would be listed as “in a symbiotic relationship” with mycorrhizal fungi. The microscopic organisms help these crops access phosphorus in the soil. Wheat would probably be friends with mycorrhiza, as cereals see some benefit from having… Read more »

7 Reasons to Compost Manure and Other Waste On Farms

There’s potential for much more composting in North American farming, say researchers at the University of Manitoba. “Turning waste into gold” was the theme for the annual field day at the U of M’s Glenlea Research Farm last week. Mario Tenuta, soil ecologist at the University of Manitoba, describes the value of farm-scale composting of manure,… Read more »

Soybean School West: Is Manitoba Still Free of Soybean Cyst Nematode?

Manitoba farmers whose soil test results say they have soybean cyst nematode in their soil may want to get a second opinion, says a soil ecologist from the University of Manitoba. While the number of soybean acres has exploded on the eastern side of the Prairies over the last few years, Western Canadian growers have… Read more »