Tag: Peter Johnson

Wheat Pete’s Word, June 21: Whacky weather, soybean aphids and rootless corn

What about that weather? It’s uniformly variable and mostly what we don’t want, explains RealAg agronomist Peter Johnson on this week’s Word. In 17 power-packed minutes, Peter laments the arrival of armyworm, soybean aphids and cereal leaf beetle. He also describes how you can fit the roots of 8-leaf rootless corn in your coffee cup…. Read more »

Wheat Pete’s Word, June 7: Hula hoops, big hay yields, & saying no to half-rate fungicides

Haying is underway (with some phenomenal yields!), soybeans are struggling, and sprayers are rolling — there’s lots of ground to cover on this week’s Word with RealAg agronomist Peter Johnson. Peter discusses the replant decision facing soybean growers, rolling timing on beans, early weed control in wheat, drift reduction agents, fungicide rates, row spacing for… Read more »

Wheat School: Counting kernels to predict yield

How much will that field yield? That’s a question RealAgriculture agronomist Peter Johnson is often asked when talking with growers. In this episode of Wheat School, he reviews the formula for estimating wheat yield. Johnson says it can be difficult to peg yield because testweight is a wildcard that can be tough to eyeball and… Read more »

Wheat Pete’s Word, May 31: Insects in a wet year, dandelions, and wild, wonderful wheat!

In this episode of Wheat Pete’s Word, RealAg Agronomist Peter Johnson wonders why insects are such a problem already, seeing as it’s been a wet year, and that usually means the fields are full of disease, not bugs. He also dives into crop progress — what sort of advances have been made in Ontario, as… Read more »

Corn School: Cold and wet means less available nitrogen

What a difference a year makes. In 2016, Ontario’s cold and dry spring conditions produced plenty of available nitrogen for the emerging corn crop. But when you fast-forward to 2017, those cold soils are now waterlogged and the wet conditions mean there’s very little nitrogen available to the crop. The wet soil conditions have a… Read more »

Wheat School: Can you do more to control fusarium?

Are you looking to step up your fusarium control measures this spring? In this episode of RealAgriculture Wheat School, resident agronomist Peter Johnson reviews the basics of managing fusarium in Ontario’s wheat crop and also offers some tips on how growers can elevate their control efforts. For Johnson, effective fusarium control starts with the basics:… Read more »

Wheat Pete’s Word, May 24: Insect alerts, head snag, and delayed corn strategies

As corn planting moves along in Ontario, the list of issues to deal with in the field is also progressing, as RealAg agronomist Peter Johnson has a pair of insect alerts on this week’s Word. Unfortunately there’s also been some frost in parts of the country, and Wheat Pete walks us through how to assess the… Read more »

Wheat Pete’s Word, May 17: Western Canada leads #plant17, leaf burn woes, and crusting corn

Cork-screw corn, good-looking western spring crops, heat unit discrepancies — it’s been a wild week of major seeding progress in Western Canada, while much of Ontario’s planting progress has been hamstrung with extremely cold and wet weather. Some Ontario farmers, including Wheat Pete’s Word host Peter Johnson, are on to plan C for field prep as rain… Read more »

Wheat School: Nitrogen stays put in cold, wet conditions

It’s been cold and it’s been raining… and raining. Does your wheat crop need more nitrogen? The answer is no, according to agronomist Peter Johnson. In this edition of RealAgriculture Wheat School, Johnson says despite the weather growers who have already applied 120 to 130 pounds of nitrogen to fields should be in good shape…. Read more »

Wheat Pete’s Word, May 10: Quality forage timing, cold temp fallout, and two-pass fungicide strategy

This week’s (almost!) cross-Canada Wheat Pete’s Word is packed full of great questions, worries about cold temperatures, solid timely answers on field management, and at least one alert, alert, alert! Your host Peter Johnson tackles questions on harvesting cereal rye (soon! this week!) while keeping compaction in mind, if corn seed is going to be… Read more »

Wheat School: Should you spray for rust?

Both stripe rust and leaf rust have been identified in the Ontario wheat crop. Will it affect your crop? What steps should you take to keep your crop safe from these leaf diseases? In this episode of RealAgriculture Wheat School, resident agronomist Peter Johnson explains that stripe rust should be a concern for all growers… Read more »

Wheat School: Action item prioritizing in a difficult spring

Wet soil, cold nights, weeds, disease, and nitrogen needs are all converging at once – what’s a wheat grower to do? As Ontario’s cold, soggy spring continues, deciding what to do next with the winter wheat crop can be a challenge, especially as the need to plant corn and soybeans becomes more pressing. In this… Read more »

Wheat Pete’s Word, May 3: Rust alerts, wet weather, and the philosophy of seeding rates

We’re kicking off May with wet, wet weather both at home and south of the border, and not one but two alerts for very early disease detection in Ontario’s Bruce and Essex Counties. Peter Johnson, your host of Wheat Pete’s Word, also has cautions on using saved soybean seed from the 2016 crop, why you… Read more »

Wheat Pete’s Word, April 26: Double Crop Thinking, Fleabane Management, and Manganese Needs

It’s the last week of April and not only is there crop in the ground in areas of southern Ontario, but there’s even a few corn and soy plants poking above ground! Don’t feel bad, though, if that’s not where you’re at — there’s plenty of field prep and planning still happening across not just… Read more »

Wheat School: Shedding Pounds Makes Healthier Seeding Rate

Peter Johnson wishes farmers managed wheat more like corn. He admits that corn’s bigger yields and higher profitability creates more interest in intensively managing the crop, but that does not excuse growers from making good, basic wheat management decisions. One thing that drives Real Agriculture’s resident agronomist crazy is wheat growers who seed based on… Read more »