Tag: University of Manitoba

Soybean School: Taking a closer look at soybean aphid thresholds

The combination of increased soybean acres and high soybean aphid pressure on the prairies in 2017 has sparked conversations about thresholds, beneficial insects, and how to decide when spraying is warranted. The economic threshold for soybean aphids in Canada has traditionally been 250 aphids per plant on 80 percent of plants, with the population still… Read more »

Soybean School: Preventing those yellow patches next year

Most of the yellow patches in soybean fields in Western Canada and the northern U.S. have disappeared as the plants have recovered, or turned necrotic and died, but one of the big questions heading into harvest is: what toll did widespread issues with iron deficiency chlorosis (IDC) earlier in the season take on yields? The… Read more »

Credits and Costs: Understanding the Carbon Balance of Annual Cropping

If farmers are going to pay a tax on carbon emissions, they should also receive credit for the carbon their farms remove from the atmosphere. Many in the farm community are trying to make that case, as the federal and provincial governments roll out pricing systems that appear to lean on the cost side of the… Read more »

When Deep Ripping Might be Your Best Bet (Plus What It Will & Won’t Fix)

The struggle to get the crop off in wet conditions has left its scars on fields across parts of Western Canada, leaving farmers with tough decisions on how to manage ruts and soil compaction. A deep ripper or subsoiler might have a fit in helping fix the damage, says a biosystems engineering professor from the University… Read more »

Breaking Down the Hot Air and Cold Truth About Carbon Emissions

Mario Tenuta has been studying greenhouse gas emissions in agriculture for longer than he’s willing to admit. Never before has he seen this much interest in the topic. “We’ve always had interest in carbon sequestration and the use of nitrogen fertilizers and manures, but now where we are called to some form of action and reductions, now… Read more »

Canola School: Alleviate Soil Compaction with Biodrilling

A wet harvest has left farmers in many areas of Western Canada considering options for addressing soil compaction. One of the options that’s seen increased interest in recent years is the use of cover crops, specifically radishes, to break up root-restricting compacted soil. “Radishes are a cover crop that are being sold specifically for compaction alleviation. You… Read more »

Wheat School: New Nitrogen Strategies Needed to Keep Up With Big Yield Potential

It’s been a long time since the last public research was conducted to support nitrogen fertilizer recommendations for wheat on the eastern side of the prairies. “The last time we did publicly-funded research on wheat yields and nitrogen fertilizer recommendations was actually about 45 years ago, so we were dealing with lower yielding wheat varieties… Read more »

Soybean & Pulse Research Agronomist Coming to the University of Manitoba

With the expansion of soybean acres in the west, Manitoba Pulse and Soybean Growers and the University of Manitoba are collaborating to address what MPSG has identified as a gap in research. MPSG is matching $400,000 from the federal and Manitoba governments to fund a five-year soybean and pulse research agronomist position in the U… Read more »

Soybean School: Refining the Soybean Aphid Threshold to Factor in Friendly Bugs

When soybean aphids start multiplying in soybean fields, the decision to spray is typically triggered by the number of aphids found on each plant. The threshold for growers in Western Canada is usually reached when there are an average of 250 aphids per plant on 80 percent of the plants. The population should still be… Read more »

Wheat School: Don’t Get Burned With Contaminant in Urea

Growers topdressing melted urea to boost wheat protein should be asking their supplier whether it contains a contaminant that’s toxic to wheat, suggests a soil scientist at the University of Manitoba. With the introduction of higher yielding wheat varieties, there’s been new interest in applying post-anthesis nitrogen to wheat to boost protein content in Western… Read more »

Canola School: Making Up for Canola’s Nonexistent Relationship with Mycorrhizae

If the world of soil biology had its own version of Facebook, crops like peas, lentils, corn and flax would be listed as “in a symbiotic relationship” with mycorrhizal fungi. The microscopic organisms help these crops access phosphorus in the soil. Wheat would probably be friends with mycorrhiza, as cereals see some benefit from having… Read more »

Granular Phosphorus Extracted from Hog Manure Shows Promise in Canola & Wheat

Granular phosphorus fertilizer recovered from liquid hog manure could be a viable alternative to traditional 11-52 monoammonium phosphate (MAP) fertilizer for growing wheat and canola, according to research done at the University of Manitoba. Struvite “looks like a fantastic fertilizer,” says Don Flaten, U of M soil scientist and one of the authors of a… Read more »

Canola School: Making Survival Difficult for Glyphosate-Resistant Kochia

Glyphosate-resistant kochia has started showing up in more of Western Canada, and as with other cases of resistance, it’s becoming evident you can’t rely on a single tool for too long. Minimizing resistant weed populations requires an integrated or diverse approach. The crop itself must help make survival difficult for potentially resistant weed seedlings, explains Rob… Read more »

Growing Phosphorus Disparity Is Not Sustainable

The number of soil tests in Manitoba with phosphorus concentrations below the critical level for crop production grew by 7 percent between 2010 and 2015, according to the new North American Soil Test Summary published by the International Plant Nutrition Institute. Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Quebec, as well as 13 U.S. states, all saw more… Read more »

Ladies & Gentlemen, Welcome to the 4R Nutrient Casino

Farmers are dealt a hand of cards each year. There are cards of fortune and cards of misfortune. Maybe it’s a wet spring or corn prices below $4/bu or skyrocketing fertilizer costs. Maybe you get all three in the same hand. A farmer can’t always choose what they’re dealt, but they can choose how to respond…. Read more »