Tag: University of Saskatchewan

Enhanced Databank Gives Veterinarians Better Access to Extra-Label Advice

Livestock and poultry veterinarians involved with extra-label use of drugs for food animals now have an improved – and vitally important – e-resource available to them. Directors of the web-based Canadian food animal residue avoidance databank (which goes by the acronym CgFARAD) have unveiled a new user-friendly and effective database and website for licensed veterinarians… Read more »

Beef School, Ep 4: Key Factors to Heifer Selection

Heifers are the keystone to improving your herd in the long-term. Carefully selected heifers result in a more productive cow herd, but you’ve got to have clearly defined goals and selection criteria to get there. In this Beef School episode, Dr. John McKinnon, professor with the University of Saskatchewan and Saskatchewan Beef Industry Chair, outlines… Read more »

Beef School, Ep 3: Setting up for Corn Grazing Success

Corn is an attractive crop for cattle producers — as silage and as an extended or winter grazing option. But corn is also mighty pricey to grow, and can require new equipment to get it in the ground. Does grazing corn really pay? To find out, Shaun Haney met with Dr. Bart Lardner, with the… Read more »

The Next Revolution In The Farm And Food Sector Has Arrived

Pundits have said the leaders of the next agricultural revolution – the digital revolution — will be big data-powered researchers, with a universe of information in hand to help make farming more efficient than ever. But no one said those researchers would be found in the labs, fields, and classrooms of some of Canada’s main… Read more »

A World First — U of S Celebrates Bison Calves Born of In-Vitro Fertilization

After years of work, researchers at the University of Saskatchewan are celebrating the successful birth of four wood bison calves, a record-breaking achievement. The calves were born through in-vitro fertilization, a first for bison. Adding to the excitement, one of the four was born of a frozen embryo originally harvested in 2012. “The babies look… Read more »

Pulse School: Herbicide Layering — The Tag Team Approach to Fighting Weeds and Resistance

“Herbicide layering” looks to be an effective approach to managing hard-to-control cleavers in pulses. As Eric Johnson, weed scientist at the University of Saskatchewan, explains in this Pulse School episode, herbicide layering is the application of different modes of action sequentially. It usually involves a pre-seed soil-applied herbicide, such as sulfentrazone, ethalflurolin or pyroxasulfone, ,… Read more »

Camelina Vying for a Place in Dairy Rations

Last January, camelina, a drought-tolerant oilseed high in protein and omega-3 fatty acids, was approved as a feed ingredient for broiler chickens. Now, work is underway to see the approval for inclusion in laying hen rations and dairy animal diets. Camelina Approved for Broiler Chicken Feed “Can you imagine a day when all our eggs… Read more »

We’re Ignoring the End User at Our Peril, Says Agricultural Economist

Last week, Eric Micheels, assistant professor in the Agricultural and Resource Economics department at the University of Saskatchewan, tweeted a link to his newly-minted dissertation, entitled Market Orientation in Production Agriculture: Measurement, Relationships and Implications. Now, normally, the word “dissertation” would do little to pique my interest, but Micheels has been vocal through the Earls debacle, and… Read more »

Wheat Genome Mapping Project Celebrates Breakthrough

An international group of scientists working on mapping the genetic code for wheat say they’ve reached a major milestone that will help them reach their goal several years earlier than expected. The International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium project, which is co-led by two Canadians and partly funded by Canadian farmers, announced yesterday it has produced… Read more »

Wheat School: Single Kernel Sorting and Salvaging High Fusarium Wheat

Researchers at the University of Saskatchewan are studying whether single kernel sorting technology is effective for salvaging fusarium-infected wheat, and ultimately, reducing the amount of waste in food production. Since acquiring a Swedish-made near-infrared seed sorter known as the BoMill TriQ in 2012, U of S researchers working together with the Canadian International Grains Institute have conducted… Read more »

$25 Million “Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence” to be Built in Saskatchewan

Plans and funding for a $25 million “Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence” were announced at the University of Saskatchewan on Thursday. Federal Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz and Saskatchewan ag minister Lyle Stewart were in Saskatoon to announce $10 million in funding for the centre under Growing Forward 2. The U of S has committed $7 million for… Read more »

Pulse School: Pea Research Spotlight on Drought, Yield and Nutrition

Peas, and pulses in general, are getting a lot of attention even as we gear up for the United Nations’ International Year of the Pulses. Global food trends seem to be favouring the commodity, with expectations that demand will continue to rise. For western Canadian pulse growers, this might mean developing an understanding of their varietal… Read more »

What Grain Transportation Problem? Prairie Drought Overshadows Need for Long-Term Transport Investment

Drought may have surpassed grain transportation as the number one challenge on the collective mind of Western Canadian grain farmers this year, but the need to address long-term logistical challenges should not be forgotten, says an ag economist from the University of Saskatchewan. “In the current situation it looks like basis levels may return to historically normal levels, however if… Read more »

A Pill for Every Ill: Our Own Complacency to Blame for the Growing Threat of Antimicrobial Resistance

It’s our own complacency that brought on the threat of antimicrobial resistance, says Trisha Dowling, a professor of veterinary clinical pharmacology at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine. “We got complacent just pretty much thinking there was a pill for every ill. So there’s been a whole lot of use of antibiotics just in case someone or… Read more »

Pulse School: Early Decisions on Lentils — Rolling, Seeding and Stand Evaluations

Most lentils will have been in the ground for a while now, with farmers now starting to scout for emergence, and staging for potential herbicide and machinery passes. According to the Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture, fields left unrolled prior to planting lentils can be rolled following emergence up to the five to seven-node stage, with the best results… Read more »